Living in trouble

The customer experience of abandonment cuts both ways.

One of my most memorably bad experiences was in the service area of a car dealership. I was clearly not of the recognized regular customers. And I arrived in a bad mood, as a consequence of some problem with my car. The service manager punished me by overlooking me for all the other customers in the area. There was no queueing system that might have protected my turn.  IStock_000020658318XSmall

As I stood there and stewed, I had plenty of time to consider what I had done to contribute to the situation and how I wish things had been handled differently. If any of the personnel has made eye contact and said, 'you're having a rough morning,' I would have relaxed. If they knew I needed to wait they could have directed me to a place to sit and told me how long to expect to wait. None of that happened, and I never returned after that first experience. 

Customers do NOT want to school your employees. If we already have a great deal of loyalty, we may go to the trouble of asking or mentioning unfair treatment. Confrontations are draining, and if we don't have an investment to protect, why should we bother? It's your business, after all. 

LoyaltyOne: Dysfunctional customer experiences risk billions in retail losses, 2015-Jun-1 [emphasis added]

It may seem counterintuitive, but retailers should welcome the irate shopper who vents her frustration in an animated scene on the sales floor. That’s because it’s the mistreated customer who walks out the door in a silent huff who places the most revenue at risk, according to a collaborative study of dysfunctional retail touch points conducted by LoyaltyOne and Verde Group with Professor of Marketing and Psychology, Dr. Deborah Small, at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.

The March 2015 survey shows that approximately half of 2,500 U.S. consumers polled reported experiencing a problem on their last shopping trip. Of those customers, 81% decided not to contact the retailer about the issue. Among these silent shoppers, 32% said they were unlikely to recommend the retailer to friends and family, putting these shoppers at-risk of decreasing their spend with the retailer.

By comparison, the study shows that shoppers who did notify retailers of their poor experience and had their problem completely resolved were 84% less likely than silent shoppers to be at risk of decreasing their spend.


Good Data on Sales and Marketing Alignment from ChaiOne

Over at ChaiOne, they've designed a new "mobile sales enablement tool" called Game Plan that looks pretty cool. Fortunately for everyone, they've put out an infographic that sharing the research that led to the Game Plan project. 

The text is a little hard to read here, so head over ChaiOne to see their original. The most interesting perspective for me was how little patience sales people have for finding the right content that's already been prepared by marketing. I knew they hate data entry, but they also hate looking for content. So Game Plan might be right for your team.

ChaiOne, Sales Content Management Done Right, 2015-Jun-3 by Jacob VonCannon:

 

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To Grow, We Have to Embrace Social Media

We all have our issues with social media. As soon as we get comfortable it changes. Unfortunately, that's an advantage! The tools are getting better in many respects. It's not a smooth road but it does lead to greater awareness.  IStock_000021700803XSmall

Anyone interested in growing a business, building a career, and developing strong relationships has no choice but to start paying attention and participating. Not constantly, but with a sense of obligation. Our friends and associates are out their sharing their experience and views and we have to acknowledge them. We can actually insult them if we don't. It's just the cost of having relationships these days. 

Hating social media is like hating healthy food. You can hate it but you can't deny it helps. 

RESET: Leveraging Social Connecting to Speed Growth, 2015-Jun-17 by Wayne O'Neill

I’m here to tell you that like it or not, social media platforms are proving to be unbelievable connection tools. And I’m all about finding more ways to effectively connect with my market and potential client base in time effective and cost effective ways.

I know that if I’m not keeping my fingers on the issues that are driving decisions in our target industries, and within our target clients, I’ll never be able to piece together solutions that connect with the things important to them.


Does the fact you have info about your customers' behavior change their expectations?

If you have a restaurant and customers use Facebook to announce their presence, do those customers expect the restaurant to notice? What if they are checking in frequently? Do they feel the restaurant should acknowledge them?  IStock_000021552541XSmall

We don't have good answers yet, but as this Harvard Business Review article points out, large chains like Starbucks now have access to this information and can integrate it into their loyalty programs. We expect that as customers experience such benefits at our competition, the customers will expect us to catch up at some point. 

Harvard Business Review: The Internet of Things is Changing How We Manager Customer Relationships, 2015-Jun-5 by Ric Merrifield

Now you can have visibility into everything. Not only can you tell that Customer A (who has a shopping app) went into a Lord & Taylor store to buy an expensive pair of shoes (which you could know with CRM). In addition, you can know how long they were in the store, where they walked, and whether they lingered or went straight to the shoe department and bought the shoes. Then, you can compare that visit to every visit to that store that Customer A has had (since getting the app), and you can at least infer what is most valuable to her. If she is always a get-in, get-out kind of shopper, speed of service may be her #1 thing. If she spends a great deal of time shopping, maybe price or product selection is her thing. If she buys a lot at the store, maybe she wants some form of recognition for her loyalty (whether it’s points or just a “welcome back”). If you compare online experiences with in-store experiences and weekend vs. weekday behaviors, your picture of the customer becomes three-dimensional very fast.

As exciting as it can be to talk about this and to see that it is happening right now in broad daylight, talking about how to assess customer experiences and how to engage customers differently when they have this information gets complicated quickly. The important thing is to acknowledge that the measurements of yesterday may need an overhaul, and to understand where your customers are on the acceptance-expectation path so you can try to stay with, if not get ahead of, them.  An increasingly common method for getting a handle on this is documenting the customer (and employee) experience journeys.


Resuscitating the Email Newsletter

I've been worried about the email newsletter. Although it's one of the most reliable ways to provide steady customer relationship management, they are so difficult to write well. But maybe it's not the writing but the content. In the article below, Blaise Lucey makes a great comparison of the spontaneity and sense of discovery we experience in social media, in contrast to the predictability of most email newsletters. I'm inspired to follow his advice.  IStock_000019856909XSmall

Moveable Ink blog: Why Live Social Media Feeds Are the Future of Email + Social, 2015-Apr-27 by Blaise Lucey

We don’t expect much from brand emails. If we get a great sale, we’re happy.

Social media, on the other hand, is something we expect to be entertaining and unpredictable. Aside from keeping up with friends (or at least stalking them), there’s an endless amount of multimedia that people can watch, listen to, and share.

That’s why people spend a lot more time on social media channels than checking their inboxes: the content changes and it’s dynamic.

With live social media feeds, you can bring that experience to the inbox. This offers a way to connect your social and email channels like never before.


How to live without being defined by edges

I spend way too much time reading. But occasionally I stumble across something that blows open my mind, making it possible for me to reach the next level of achievement, or something... a higher state of existence. If you want to go there youself, stop reading this and instead read The Web's Grain by Frank Chimero. You'll enjoy it more if you have a big screen and you may want to turn your sound low if people are nearby.  

I have a habit of drawing circles that represent a day in my life and then to divide it up and try to proportion my interests to the amount of time I have. The worst part is when I actually label the time of the day on the slices. I'm defining my life by its edges. In real life, I'm always running over those slice edges as things take longer than I anticipated. 

If the edge of a slice is the time when we have to leave to pick up a child from school, then we need to put an alarm bell on it. Otherwise we need to understand that these edges limit us. 

I want to live a life filled with passion. When we're immersed in what we're doing, then we go into "flow," and lose our sense of time. We wake up and realize we've gone over the slice edge. 

We cannot live with passion and define our life by slices. Instead we have to assemble the pieces of our lives in a way that they can hold together. It happens all the time in real life. Things just cohere or stick together. The parts grow unevenly and the shape is unexpected. 

David Hockney: Billy Wilder Lighting His Cigar, 1982

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FrankChimero.com: The Web's Grain, 2015-Feb-20 by Frank Chimero

Simply put, the edgelessness of the web tears down the constructed edges in the company. Everything is so interconnected that nobody has a clear domain of work any longer—the walls are gone, so we’re left to learn how to collaborate in the spaces where things connect....

The size of what we’re making is unknown until we know what we’re putting there. So, it’s better to come up with an arrangement of elements and assign them to a size, rather than the other way around. We need to start drawing, then put the box around it. ...the perfect example of not drawing the box until you know what goes in it. [Emphasis mine.]

...we’re creating assemblages of elements, then associating them with the appropriate space.... 

You could say that our current technological arrangement has spread out too far, and it is starting to look and feel wrong. Fortunately, we can treat this over-expansion just like everything else I’ve mentioned. We can draw a line, and create a point of reassembly for what we’ve made. We can think about how to shift, move, and resize the pieces so that they fall back in line with our intentions.


Practice, practice, practice

Sigh. I'm addicted to learning and not to practicing. It's really biting me now.

JamesClear.com: Stop Thinking and Start Doing: The Power of Practicing More, 2015-March

We assume that if we knew about a better strategy, then we would get better results. We believe that a new result requires new knowledge.

What I’m starting to realize, however, is that new knowledge does not necessarily drive new results. In fact, learning something new can actually be a waste of time if your goal is to make progress and not simply gain additional knowledge.

It all comes down to the difference between learning and practicing.