Finding a better way out of stressful situations
In all email communications: give the gift of a great subject line

Ask people to be consistent... they'll try.

When you're trying to get people to follow you, don't ask them to support your ideas... instead tell them you'll help them be more true to themselves. Tq140619od

New Yorker: I Don't Want to be Right, 2014-May-19 by Maria Konnikova

It’s the realization that persistently false beliefs stem from issues closely tied to our conception of self that prompted Nyhan and his colleagues to look at less traditional methods of rectifying misinformation. Rather than correcting or augmenting facts, they decided to target people’s beliefs about themselves. In a series of studies that they’ve just submitted for publication, the Dartmouth team approached false-belief correction from a self-affirmation angle, an approach that had previously been used for fighting prejudice and low self-esteem. The theory, pioneered by Claude Steele, suggests that, when people feel their sense of self threatened by the outside world, they are strongly motivated to correct the misperception, be it by reasoning away the inconsistency or by modifying their behavior.


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