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Insecurity kills innovation

I appreciate that the researchers at the Equality of Opportunity Project are sticking to the facts, but I can't help wishing they speculate a little about why children from low-income families don't become inventors. In order to risk innovation, people have to feel confident they can take risks without losing their way of life. We can find plenty of research on the stress of being poor

Vox: Groundbreaking empirical research shows where innovation really comes from, 2017-Dec-5 by Matthew Yglesias

Rather than cutting taxes on financially successful adults, we ought to think about how to improve what Chetty calls our “capacity to tap into currently underused potential.” He and his colleague calculate that if women, minorities, and children from low- and middle-income families invented at the same rate as white men from high-income (top 20%) families, there would 4 times as many inventors in America as there are today.

While Congress prepares to pass a tax bill that pushes the old conventional wisdom about bolstering financial incentives, empirical research suggests that starving the government of funds could be counterproductive. Ensuring that all children who show a talent for math and science are encouraged to innovate, provided with role models, and shown paths forward would cost money. But making sure that poor, female, black, and Latino kids aren’t locked out of innovation isn’t just a crucial matter of fairness; it’s quite literally the most important thing we can do for the future of humanity.

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It's hard enough to figure out what role we want to play in life. We shouldn't have to fight for the right to play it.

Life in my thirties was miserable because I realized that I didn't understand what I need from life. A misguided professional therapist compounded the problem, and I wasted my best income-earning years. These days I just want to help people operate from their strengths and find what they need to sustain themselves. One of the ways to do this is to figure out where we want to invest our loyalty. We get to choose. 

An open letter to everyone who is concerned about the wage gap, 2017-Dec-2 by Penelope Trunk

It happens that women choose to spend more time parenting than men. It doesn’t mean men are lame for not spending more time with kids. Remember feminism? It’s about everyone getting to choose. It’s not about belittling people’s choices or saying it’s not really their choice but rather a result of societal pressure. In fact that line of thinking undermines feminism because it says there can be no genuine choices because all societies have societal expectations.

A fresh view of feminism for 2015, 2015-Jan-12 by Penelope Trunk

I realized there’s positively no way to keep things equal, and everyone suffers from trying to establish equality. People can only give what they are good at giving. And people can’t stop needing what they need. It’s what they need.

Too little too late: Sheryl Sandberg apologizes for Lean In, 2016-May-11 by Penelope Trunk

We don’t need a role model. We need a role. Each of us wants to feel like we found our spot, what’s right for us. And it’s not helping to have to justify our choices to anyone but ourselves.

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Why we should focus on helping our customers become better people.

One of the coolest short books I've ever read about marketing is Michael Schrage's Who Do You Want Your Customers to Become? A recent blog post by Seth Godin (see below) got me thinking about it again. 

People in marketing and advertising profession are often seen as venal. (Thanks, Mad Men.) What if we focused on helping our customers become better people? 

Seth's blog: Marketing about power and with power, 2017-Aug-28 by Seth Godin

Danny Meyer has built a restaurant empire around the idea that customers ought to be powerful. Instead of bullying his patrons, he trains his people to serve. No velvet rope, just a smile.

Each of us gets to choose what sort of marketing we respond to. Those that use bully tactics to gain power over us only get away with it because it works (on some people, some of the time). And often, when power is put into our hands (sometimes known as freedom... the freedom to create, to speak up, to lead, to challenge), we blink and walk away.

Some people persist in thinking that marketing is about ads or low prices. It's not. It's about human nature and promises and who we see when we look in the mirror.

When you see confusion, look for fear, and look for the dynamics of power.

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To change someone's mind: start by exploring what you can learn from them

We could make an impression on another person with an impassioned speech, but we are unlikely to change their mind unless we show them that we actually appreciate their position. Not that we validate it, but that we accept it. It is what it is. From there we can begin a journey. The first step is to show the other person how their ideas have influenced us, what we've learned, and how we're going to change based on learning from them. 

When I started studying training as a profession, my role models made a point that adult learners are competent. They are NOT looking to be fixed. We should start by asking them how they are currently coping with challenges. What do they know and how have they succeeded? We learn together. 

Harvard Business Review: Closing the Strategy-Execution Gap, 2017-Oct-30 by Alison Reynolds and David Lewis

People do not change their minds through being told, however open and inclusive the communication may be. When we have skin in the game, reason counts for far less than we might think. It is an oft-forgotten feature of human nature that if you want to influence someone, a good start is to show they have influenced you. If you are open to others, others tend to be open to you. Influence comes through interaction.

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More than technology, CRM is process

We now have so many excellent CRM applications available, the challenge is finding one that can fit the processes that you will actually use. 

Clearhead: You Can't Buy Personalization, 2017-Jul-18 by David J. Neff

You can’t buy personalization. Why not? Because it’s not a single technology point solution. Don’t get me wrong: when it comes to technology point solutions you can buy product recommendation tools. You can buy testing tools that allow personalization. You can buy audience segmentation tools. You can even buy a data warehouse. But you can’t buy personalization. So why not?

To personalize in a meaningful way you need to bring together disparate data sources and teams that might not typically ever operate outside their silos.

Similar to testing, we find that lack of technology isn’t the problem when it comes to personalization. According to our latest research, while 64% of retailers have the technology they tend to lack the process and rigor needed to execute their personalization efforts.

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